Creating an Inclusive Cycling Network – The Main Network

In the previous article we covered the basics of how to create a cycle network. In this article we will look at the main cycle network and how this can be designed using the techniques outlined in CROW. Planning the network The main cycling network should create a grid of routes around 400m apart. From CROW: Design Manual for Bicycle Traffic (page 64): Cohesion is the most elementary requirement for a main cycle network. … A simplified indicator for the extent of cohesion within the built environment is the grid size of the main cycle network. A grid size of[…]

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Space for Heaton

Meet the newly formed SPACE for Heaton (www.spaceforheaton.com). This short video is an introduction and a call to arms for all residents of the Heaton/High Heaton area who are interested in joining the new community group campaigning for a better environment for all. You can sign up to get news and updates on their website. Hold the Oscars. SPACE for Heaton *THE MOVIE* is here… Hold the Oscars. SPACE for Heaton *THE MOVIE* is here… pic.twitter.com/iyp9D1vv72 — SPACE for Heaton (@SPACEforHeaton) February 12, 2018  

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Our Infrastructure Safari ride through Heaton

This is a short account of our infrastructure safari through Heaton, code name: SCR6 Benfield. The concept of Strategic Cycle Routes (SCR) in Newcastle is well established and monies from the Cycling City Ambition Fund (CCAF) have been earmarked to build part of them. So, earlier on in the year we came up with a plan – we thought it would be useful to ride them and assess how much needs to be done to make them safe, convenient, direct and attractive while connecting places of interest such as schools, shops and employment centres. The SCR network is the backbone[…]

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Newcastle is not a car city

Newcastle cyclists want to see action by their council as Census 2011 data shows that over 40% of Newcastle’s households do not have a car. This new data makes it only fair to ask for much more space to be provided for walking and cycling. Novocastrians are less car-centred than civil servants make out and politicians are led to believe. Two out of five households do not use a car and cycling is on the rise, albeit slow. Campaigners are yet again to give literature to the decision-makers to bring them up to ‘walking and cycling speed’: a decelerated lifestyle[…]

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