A pound saved for every mile cycled

A campaign group previously revealed the level of savings that current commuter cyclists make to the city of Newcastle to be £3 million, annually. These savings, however, are already sunk into the city’s economy and budgets so that decision makers are blind to them. The group has now asked what savings could be made if people switched from car use to cycling, in another attempt to engage decision-makers. Using data from the UK Census and World Health Organisation (WHO), newcycling.org has calculated the future savings, that the city is still to benefit from in the coming years. It also says[…]

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Letter to Eugene Milne – Public Health

Professor Eugene Milne Director of Public Health Newcastle Newcastle Civic Centre NE1 8QH Dear Professor Milne, We read with interest the article including your comment in the Chronicle http://www.chroniclelive.co.uk/news/north-east-news/cycle-campaigner-skeptical-over-newcastles-8545887. We wrote to your predecessor in 2012 making the case for public health’s involvement with improving cycling conditions in Newcastle, asking for a meeting. We received no reply. We have since written to Councillor Forbes. https://newcycling.org/going-public-health It seems timely to perhaps restart the previously begun public health conversation. In particular, we would like to make you aware of NICE ph8 http://www.nice.org.uk/guidance/PH8 and ‘The Energy Glut’ both which make strong recommendations to address adverse urban environments[…]

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The value of current cyclists revealed

Calculations carried out by Newcycling, Newcastle’s cycling campaign, using HEAT, an internationally acclaimed economic assessment tool for walking and cycling, show that the contribution that current city commuter cyclists make is worth over £3 million to the city of Newcastle every year. Using the latest Census 2011 data and feeding it into the economic assessment tool, the campaign group calculates that Newcastle’s 3,300 commuter cyclists save the city over £3.3 million in costs simply by living healthier and more productive lives. Last year’s Get Britain Cycling report states that at least £10 per head per year is needed – that[…]

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Public Health and Urban Design – a letter

A letter to Newcastle’s Health and Wellbeing Board in response to their consultation: We welcome that remodelling of physical environment is seen as a necessary measure, notably in the obesity-related supporting document – for the sake of a healthy and active community are key to the success of designing pro-people environments in which residents can live, work, shop, learn for life, travel safely and meet and connect with others socially. As Chris Boardman says “I think the answers will lead us in one direction: we need more and better provision for people who want to travel by bike. When we[…]

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Going public on health

Did you know that our patron is Prof Stephen Singleton? He has been backing the campaign since our early days: “Cycling could transform Tyneside. If cycling was a tablet or a medical intervention it would be a best buy for the health service” and he continues here. More recent developments in the health landscape will result in decision-making on public health strategy and budget spending being more made more locally. You may recall we’d previously contacted the Directors of Public Health, we’ve now written to the Chairs of the respective local authority boards Dear Councillor Forbes (Newcastle) Dear Councillor Henry[…]

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Public Health – letter to Directors of Public Health

With recent changes to the health landscape, we’ve written to the three Directors of Public Health in Tyneside alerting them to how cycling’s contribution to health will help towards their goal of a healthier Tyneside. For cycling to truly thrive, spending on infrastructure is vital, and we look towards health directors to use their new influence over council spending. Here’s the letter: Dear Director of Public Health LOCAL PUBLIC HEALTH AND CYCLING As Public Health moves into local authorities from the NHS we wish to highlight cycling as a valuable public health intervention. This was something Liam Donaldson discussed in[…]

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Archived pages

This page has been archived   ———————————- A message from our patron Prof Stephen Singleton Cycling could transform Tyneside. If cycling was a tablet or a medical intervention it would be a best buy for the health service. Regular cyclists tend to live longer, have less work absence and those who cycle 25 miles or more a week are measurably fitter than non-cyclists. Countries that have promoted and provided for cyclists have less obesity than car centric countries like Britain. But the benefits of encouraging cycling are not just better health but a better urban environment. Encouraging cycling in place[…]

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