Newcastle Blue House: proven spare road capacity, green corridor and failing political system

Newcycling were taken aback by the plans for the Northern Access Corridor between Blue House to Haddricks. These are motorway-scale plans that do not belong in the heart of Newcastle. The project will damage communities and the economy. The road traffic along this corridor has actually substantially reduced, baselined against 2000, 2005, and 2010, see file attached below. Hence, the current plans make no sense. Furthermore, Newcastle needs to prioritise active travel to cement its regional status. A link to the full technical response is given below. Katja Leyendecker, chair of newcycling.org, says “People do not want to live on[…]

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City Centre 20mph expansion TRO

We would firstly like to express our thanks and support to the the council for extending the city centre 20mph. This is something we have been asking for over the past few years and we are glad to see that this is happening. We would also like to take this as opportunity to raise a few questions and points that we have about the 20mph zone. Firstly, we feel that a number of streets should also be included in the 20mph zone: Barras Bridge, between Claremont Road and Haymarket The Quayside – in particular the section East of the swing[…]

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Data: one-way streets, contraflows and permeability

From my own experience, but also guidance documents and info sheets (see bottom), it’s pretty clear that opening up one-way streets to cycling is one of the most inexpensive and effective ways to quickly improve cycling experience. It of course works – no magic involved – by giving connectivity, reconnecting shortcuts where there previously was a detour and more generally by increasing permeability and route choice. I even ended last year’s youreport article, where members discussed good examples of cycling infrastructure from here and abroad, with this sentence: “The local cycle group in Braunschweig curates a spatial representation of contraflows[…]

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Statistically speaking – visualised

Newcastle is less dependent on the car than Councillors and civil servants would like you to believe. We had a look behind the scenes… at the statistics. It started with Neil Murphy putting the Census 2011 data into context for us here and Claire Prospert summarising and explaining further here. Whilst cycle to work numbers (this is the data the Census collects) are generally pitifully low compared to our European brothers and sisters who enjoy 10, 20 even 50 and 60% of bike-commute modal share, in Newcastle it’s the wards North-Northeast of the city centre that cycle more. The highest[…]

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Census 2011 – what it all means for cycling in Newcastle

At our Members Meeting in June, Neil Murphy from Beyond Green shed light on the Census 2011 data and the changes in commuting patterns between 2001 and 2011 in Newcastle. You may remember the census question “What’s your main method of travel to work?”… well, here’s the findings. First of all, we all heard about the large growth in walking and cycling. Well, let’s be wary as there is a difference. We’re starting from such a low, nearly undetectable, base that an increase from a total bike modal share of 2% to (now nearly) 3% in Newcastle is far from[…]

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Plenty Twenty in Newcastle

PRESS RELEASE 10.11.2012 The city prides itself in being an early adopter of the 20mph speed limit. But is Newcastle going far enough? We investigate. Talk to people in the street or pose the question at public meetings “What is Newcastle’s speed limit?” and people are surprised to hear that Newcastle is a City of Twenty. Newcastle Cycling Campaign is intrigued, and spurred on by the added cycle safety 20mph can bring, members of the Newcastle Cycling Campaign took a closer look. Katja Leyendecker of Newcastle Cycling Campaign “We hear that a staggering 90% of Newcastle’s roads has been converted[…]

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Cycle counters map

We are keeping an eye on monitoring cycle use in Newcastle. A number of cycle counters have been installed in Newcastle over the past years, and we’ve created a map to “keep track” of where these are. We will review these locations to make sure they are right: specially once the strategic cycle routes are agreed it will be a good time to check these overlap. Quantifying cycling is important: the counters will provide data that can be used – amongst other things – to evaluate effectiveness of schemes and for building cases for funding bids. It’s vital that this[…]

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