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Gosforth Corridor Scheme Proposed Cycle Lanes

13 February 2014 Sent to: Councillors from three wards, Newcastle North MP, cycle officer We SUPPORT IN PRINCIPLE the creation of cycle-specific space on Great North Road, but we do question the adequacy of the strength of separation that’s proposed. We’d suggest that a cycle lane (space solely separated by a painted line) currently planned for West side (north of Park Avenue to Broadway) is not enough on a fast busy road like Great North Road that has an 85%ile speed of 37mph and two-way traffic flow of between 20,000 and 30,000 daily (up to or over 3,000 hourly peak).[…]

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Gosforth Corridor Scheme TRO

31 January 2014 Sent to: Councillors from three wards, Newcastle North MP, Cabinet Transport Cllr Ged Bell, cycle champion Cllr Marion Talbot, council officers (various) Dear all In the light of what’s been presented and the lack of communication leading up to the traffic order being issued, we feel obliged to OBJECT to the proposal as it stands. This is on the grounds of vehicle movement and road / junction capacity being negligently the sole design priority for this scheme, at the expense of walking / cycling safety, attractiveness of place and long-term environmental factors (air, noise) that can only[…]

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Transport Committee – local decision making on transport expenditure

To a call by the Transport Committee – Local decision making on transport expenditure Newcycling (Newcastle’s cycling campaign, 1,200 members, volunteer organisation, constituted, formed in 2010) would like to respond to your request about views on local transport expenditure. We will focus solely on cycling (and progress on council policy to increase cycle modal share) as this shows both the complexity of the process and the current disconnect in clear accountability and evidenced decision-making for public spending and policy. The wider context is that other countries spend up to £30 per head on cycling to extend and maintain their networks[…]

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Transport Committee – Cycling safety: follow up

To a call by the Transport Committee – Cycling safety: follow up Newcycling (Newcastle’s cycling campaign, 1,200 members, volunteer organisation, constituted, formed in 2010 ) would like to respond to your request about views on cycling safety. We will comment on cycle safety purely in the context of urban transport cycling. Specifically you ask to answer three questions: 1) Whether cycling is safe, particularly in towns and cities We believe that the current road environment makes cycling a transport option available only to the ‘brave and fit’ thereby leaving dormant the large majority of the population and the potential of[…]

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Getting to the core of 1Core (cont)

If you were put out by the 300+ page document, but were prepared to read something, here it was: Cycling pp138-141, click here. Read more about the 1Core here CORE CYCLING POLICY    Introduction The core policy, above, reads okay at first sight and is no doubt well-intentioned. To avoid later queries and possible heartache, we’d really like to ask what “wherever [sic.] appropriate” and “promoting cycle improvements” means. And we note that Newcastle, after some to-ing and fro-ing, now once again agrees with us that the city centre North-South route (aka ‘Great’ North Cycleway or Atkin’s red route) is[…]

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Central Station

To: Goodwin, Adam; Dyke, Samantha; Streetworks Cc: Forbes, Nick (Cllr); Kingsland, Joanne (Cllr); O’Brien, Geoffrey (Cllr); Talbot, Marion (Cllr); Bill Dodds; Heather Evans; Bryn Dowson Subject: Fwd: Central Gateway – Proposed TRO   In response to the above TRO, we would like to offer our views on the scheme for the spatial redesign of the Central Station Gateway and the process that has been used to produce the plans for this scheme. We thank the council and the officers involved for the way in which the stakeholder consultation process has been carried out. The use of an iterative consultation process in drawing[…]

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Fenham Hall Drive – driving you mad

Newcastle does not appear to have the same openness and clarity of mind that Birmingham has recently demonstrated. At the city’s peril, Newcastle risks to hold back progress for safer cycling and walking. Our city has of course its 10-year cycle strategy. But just how the ambitious target of 20% of all short journeys to be done by bike by 2022 (a tenfold increase on current levels) is to materialise, is a question to be asked especially in the light of council’s approach to Fenham Hall Drive. For more on Fenham Hall Drive click here Birmingham has recently looked at[…]

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Gosforth transport corridor proposals

To: Gary Macdonald (Newcastle City Council) Cc: Harvey Emms, Cllr Nigel Todd, Cllr Henry Gallagher, Cllr Bill Shepherd (all Newcastle City Council), Bill Dodds (vice-chair of Forum) Hello Gary GOSFORTH CYCLE SAFETY FUND It’s good to see resources and funds being pooled to develop an area much in need of a make-over, yet it does remain unclear to us why Gosforth High Street should require a bypass for “less experienced cyclists”. Please note that the DfT bid document calls them more aptly “new cyclists”. Does the council want to push cyclists out of the way? Gosforth High Street is part[…]

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Walker Welbeck Road – formal consulation response

From: Newcastle Cycling Campaign Date: 1 February 2013 Subject: “Welbeck Road Area – Proposed Cycle Lanes and Prohibition of Waiting”, ref GH/P44/951 To: traffic.notices@newcastle.gov.uk Cc: Cllrs Todd, Murison, CTC, Sustrans Dear all WELBECK ROAD Following our email dated 16 December 2012, we, as an organisation representing 715 members, re-iterate our SUPPORT for the proposals to improve cycling conditions – and indeed public realm in general – along the Welbeck corridor in Walker. All our points stated in this previous reply remain. We would like to stress that all features including the mandatory bicycle lanes are road safety improvements that will[…]

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